Tag Archives: project management

6 Tips To Designing Effective Information Radiators

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Your team space should deliver a message

Recently I’ve been helping a new team setup their team space. Now, I’m a big fan of hanging stuff on walls. Big visible stuff. But there’s more to it than that. When deciding what you should put where you are actually crafting a message to anyone that walks into the space.

My personal metric for knowing when you’ve done this effectively is to answer the following question: Does it change someone’s mood?

In my opinion, when anyone walks into your team space, from the newest dev to the most senior executive, what’s hanging on the walls should make them feel differently within a matter of minutes. If that doesn’t happen, something’s off.

Now I’m not advocating that teams throw a bunch of crap up to simply appease people, especially those not usually in the space. In fact, the big visible stuff should be minimalistic; the least amount of information required to paint a deep, rich picture of what is going on, what value is being added, when things are happening, and anything else that is useful.

I’m not going to go into what specifically any of the stuff should be. There is tons of information out there on that such as information radiators, styles of team boards, card maps and lots more. Instead, I encourage you to think about the message you want your space to convey.

Here are a few things to consider in addition to the actuall stuff you choose to hang up:

1) If it’s hanging up, make sure it’s actually big and visible 

Sometime I wish plotters were never invented. Release burn-down charts and code coverage trends are examples of useful things to hang up. Too often though, I see people (usually PMs with whiz-bang tools) print them out. I assume they do this because they think it’s easier, but walk across to the opposite side of the team space and tell me if you can read it…all of it. It’s not enough to see the trend lines if you don’t know what the chart is trending or what the axes are. Instead, draw it out on some paper or a white board with a big fat marker. Now go walk across the room…yeah, betcha can read that!

2) If it’s hanging up, make sure it’s useful

like to think of this as pruning. Something that was once useful may have run its course. If so, tear it down. If you need it later, recreate it. However, before just tearing stuff down, make sure the whole team agrees that what ever it is is no longer useful. When in doubt leave it up, there are usually ways to make more room if you need it. It’s also important for the team to consider organizational usefulness. Not everything will be the most useful to the team itself, but sometimes to managers or other stake holders. PMs like release burn downs and cost burn-ups, CFOs like value stories etc… These should not dominate the space, but they are still useful, and it’s important for the team to understand their organizational usefulness as well 🙂

3) If you need something useful, make sure you hang it up 

The space is not a fixed thing. Obviously if we can tear stuff down we can put new stuff up. The process of software development is journey or learning and discovery. Visualizing different things along the way can help a team communicate, both with each other as well as those outside the team. If you think something might be useful, hang it up for a while, try it out. If it doesn’t add the value you thought, ask how it can be improved. If after a while it is still not providing value, see #2.

4) If it’s hanging up, make sure it’s in a good position 

Not all wall space is created equal. This could be due to many things such as lighting, vantage point, furniture arrangement etc… The best thing to do is plan a little bit before you hang something up. How often will it be updated? Is it a conversation centerpiece? Should it be visible to a passer-by? Once decided, go hang it up. If things change and it needs moved, move it…it’s only paper and tape right?

5) If it’s hanging up, take pride in making it

Remember, you are crafting a message. You want things to be visible, digestible and useful. Those traits can be hard to achieve if your big visible stuff looks messy, half-assed or cluttered. It doesn’t take that long to use a straight edge instead of free-hand drawing. Create a color scheme of post-its or stickers. Use different size index cards to mean different things. Create a legend. It doesn’t have to be a work of art, but it should be tidy (within reason) and professional looking to communicate your message effectively. If you think something has gotten too messy over time, clean it up or redo it…it usually doesn’t take very long.

6) If it’s hanging up, it’s a living document

Don’t be afraid to enhance anything that’s hanging up. Feel free to draw, stick stickers, add post-its or whatever else adds value. You can usually tell which documents (big visible charts) a team find the most useful by the amount of enhancements made to it!

Finally, don’t forget to test this stuff out when you think you are done. Stand back from your space and look at it. What does it say to you? Stand in the doorway or hallway and look in. What does it look like from there? Have people from other teams walk through. Is there anything that is unclear to them? Ask a manager, director or executive to walk by. What were they able to tell by just looking? Maybe do a few of these every now and then as your space evolves with different stuff.

Ultimately, don’t forget that original question from way up there: Does it change someone’s mood? Folks should feel better about what the team is doing, where the project is headed, and what they are getting for all the team’s effort. If this is the case, then you’ve successfully crafted both an effective team space as well as an effective message.

This post was originally published by the Matt Barcomb on odbox.co and was reposted with permission. 

The Multitasking Myth

As a parent of an ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) child, I have had the unplanned but eye-opening experience of learning how to deal with ADD.  Why eye-opening?  I have to admit, I have always been skeptical of the validity of some of today’s conditions that become accepted by the medical community at large.  The sheer rate of new conditions grows each year.  When my child was first diagnosed, I wondered if ADD was truly a legitimate issue or if it was created by pharmaceutical companies who conveniently happened to have a medication to manage the condition.  It also seemed to me like a convenient excuse for those who were lazy, unmotivated, or simply capable of handling the daily demands of the modern world.  I have since learned that I was completely wrong.struggling

After experiencing the effects of ADD has on my child and consequently putting together a plan to manage it, I have seen a 180 degree turn in my child’s ability to deal with the anxiety that accompanies ADD.  My child has gone from a very challenged student to a peak performer at school almost immediately.  Also, my child’s satisfaction level with achievements and self-confidence is at an all-time high.

There are three things we implemented which have directly contributed to the successful turn-around:

  1. A sustainable and recognizable daily routine
  2. Prioritizing what is most important, communicating it to our child, and focusing on that list one item at a time
  3. Constantly re-evaluate #2 and adjusting  accordingly

Since being introduced to ADD I have become familiar with the effects it has on performance, self-satisfaction, and self-confidence.   I have also noticed similarities between these effects and the effects of multitasking on performance, self-satisfaction, and self-confidence in the workplace.  Over the years, I have even seen a number of cases of what one could term as “artificially-manufactured ADD”.

Why make this comparison?  Because many in the business community treat multitasking in the same way I first treated ADD; the effects on productivity are really over-hyped and those who can’t multitask effectively are just lazy, unmotivated, or incapable of handling the tasks of today’s business climate. 

Multitasking is not a modern concept; in fact it is believed to have been around for a long time.  Today’s work environments drive multitasking demands on our time almost by default.  CNN describes multitasking as “a post-layoff corporate assumption that the few can be made to do the work of many”.  I’m not sure if I completely agree with this viewpoint, but some studies show that multitasking is a less efficient approach to work than focusing on similar types of tasks at the same time, or focusing on one specific deliverable at a time.   There are many suggestions as to how to address and minimize the effects of multitasking or how to operate to avoid it.  In my experience, the best way to minimize performance loss of multitasking is similar to the approach we have taken to counteract the effects of ADD with my child:

  1. Be consistent and predictable wherever possible
  2. Prioritize your work and single-thread your efforts whenever possible
  3. Constantly re-evaluate #2 for updated priorities and adjust when needed

Highly productive teams groom, prioritize, re-groom, and re-prioritize their work constantly.  They also are consistently inquiring about priority and adjusting accordingly.  Most importantly, they work to keep their efforts as single-threaded (one item at a time) as possible to maximize their productivity.   The effect on your group’s performance, as well as your group’s output quality and agility, will be greater than you think.

Want to learn more ways to create high-performing teams? Check out another post by Mike Jebber – Team Building: Diversity Uncovers What Experience Can’t.

Climbing Mountains With Agile Methods

Agile methods strive to break large goals into smaller achievable parts. In this post we will cover some high level concepts that have made it easy for us to achieve some big goals for our clients.

agile goalsBig goals, in many ways, are like mountains. They are daunting, arduous to climb (and well worth the view from the top). They capture our imagination and inspire bold action in ourselves and others just by being. Many gaze up at their peaks determined to reach the summit, but all too often, fall short for one reason or another.

Our struggles maintaining motivation when taking on large initiatives often stem from over-focusing our energy and attention on the end result, rather than the next step we must take to get there. We can get so overwhelmed by the sheer size of what lies ahead, frustrated by slow progress, and tripped up by unexpected pitfalls, we become demoralized long before we ever get close to the finish line. When this happens, it is because we have forgotten that big things are never accomplished with a single herculean effort; rather, they are overcome in progressive iterations – tackling a series of smaller tasks that bring us one step closer to the summit.

Agile Goals

When you break large objectives into small, measurable, achievable tasks, suddenly the mountain doesn’t seem so insurmountable. You start to think, okay, yeah…I can do this. Taking the journey step-by-step will will allow you to adapt when plans shift and celebrate milestones along the way. Side note: Seriously, don’t forget to celebrate the milestones – they are critical for maintaining morale and reinforcing positive change. This isn’t to say you should allow yourself to lose site of the big picture, just don’t let the magnitude kill your momentum.

This deliberate, iterative approach to “mountain” climbing is the same one we teach our clients and practice ourselves here at LeanDog. Here’s how it works: when someone comes in looking for help, whether for coaching or a development project, we always start by first assessing the situation. We explore every facet of their initiative to define where it is they are trying to go, the resources they have to get them there, and the struggles they may be facing. We also challenge assumptions and test hypotheses to uncover areas of risk hidden in their way. In doing so, we break their mountain down into a big pile of small, achievable objectives. We collaborate with them to prioritize those objectives and, through progressive iterations, we are able to carve out a path up the mountain together. The result is a clear direction, measurable progress, mitigated risk, and the overall feeling that yeah…we can do this.

By breaking down your large initiatives into smaller, achievable steps, challenging assumptions, celebrating milestones, and prioritizing tasks of highest value, you’ll find that what once seemed to be an impossible undertaking, is anything but. Before you know it, you’ll be enjoying the view from the summit and gazing confidently toward your next mountain.

How do you and your team achieve your biggest agile goals and initiatives?

To learn more about how Agile processes can help you climb your mountains, download a free copy of the LeanDog Agile Discussion Guide.