Category Archives: Organizational Design

For leaders focused on building smart, scalable, and driven organizations, gain the Organizational Design resources you need to achieve continuous improvement and alignment.

Agile…and BEYOND!!

LeanDog Agile experts, Matt Barcomb, Mike Kvintus, and Jeff Morgan, are at Agile and Beyond today and tomorrow. Take a peek at some of the knowledge they will be dropping while they are there:

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Barcomb

Matt (@mattbarcomb) is a product development specialist with a penchant for organization design. He works with companies to turn software development into a core competency by integrating product development activities with business practices. Matt takes a pragmatic, systems approach to improvement, working with stakeholders throughout medium and large organizations. He has experience working with product management and software delivery teams as well as executive leadership teams, sales, services, and operations in a variety of industries. Matt enjoys challenging mental models, simplifying the seemingly complex, and uncovering the “why” behind the what. He shares his experiences, questions and ideas at www.odbox.co

Thursday, May 5 @ 10AM Value-focused prioritization & decision making

Does prioritizing your development portfolio seem unclear or mired in politics? Ever feel like the decisions for what gets worked on when are somewhere between arbitrary and emotional? Ever get tired of providing cost estimates for work of uncertain value? If you answered yes to any of the above questions, this session is for you! Matt Barcomb will open with introductory concepts about shifting from a cost focus to a value focus for development work. Next, providing business value for user stories will be debunked. Then, a collaborative framework for prioritization, Benefit Mapping, will be discussed. Finally, Matt will end with ways to simplify the cost evaluation of work and risk.

Friday, May 6 @ 10AM Using Flow-based Road Mapping & Options

If you’d like an alternative to typical, quarter-by-quarter, schedule oriented road mapping (and all the associated waste) then this session is for you. Matt Barcomb will introduce a Cadenced Flow approach to flow-based road mapping. He will first cover how to layout and execute a road map based on models that better fit software planning as well as how to transform your existing plans. Next, using options thinking to frame work will be explored and how to use starting and stopping triggers for options, reducing the need of blind budgeting or project practices. Finally, Matt will wrap up by touching on a few key metrics that will let you monitor and evaluate your new road map.

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Cheezy is an international speaker and keynote presenter in different Agile conferences. He has spoken 6 times at the Agile 20XX conferences as well as other ones like Agile development East and West, Mile High Agile, Agile and Beyond, Path to Agility, etc.

Friday, May 6 • 3:00pm – 4:40pm Tested!

You’ve heard that quality belongs to everybody on an Agile team. You’ve heard that testers and developers should “collaborate” in order to drive quality higher. You’ve heard that automated tests help a team continuously validate the quality. It’s time to stop thinking about it! It’s time to stop talking about it! It’s time to make it happen! Watch Ardi and Cheezy do this in front of your eyes. They will build a web application driven by acceptance and unit tests.You will see how a Product Owner, Tester and Developer will create executable User stories, develop the code to validate these stories and refactor along the way. At the end, you will get a taste of what a Continuous Delivery pipeline looks like. Prepare to collect your jaws from the floor!
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Kvintus

Friday, May 6 • 10:00am – 10:45am Worthless Story Card Estimates

How much of your time is wasted estimating story cards? We’ll explore some alternatives to estimating story cards and review real-world comparisons of tracking work using story points vs. counting story cards. Not sure when story card estimates are needed? We’ll discuss that too. All discussions will be based on real-world examples and comparisons of alternatives for several projects. We’ll also discuss #NoEstimates and how it fits in. You’ll leave with an understanding of ways to plan/track agile projects and the tradeoffs involved with alternatives to story card estimates.

Team Building: Diversity Uncovers What Experience Can’t

 

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Diversity tends to bring a broader perspective and a broader perspective is critical to strong team building. A good friend of mine recently told me a story that illustrates just how important diversity (in skill set, age, gender, background, etc.) is to building successful teams and how diversity finds things experience alone will not.

My friend’s daughter recently started an internship as a mechanical engineer with a well-respected global company who manufactures plumbing equipment. Her first assignment was with a group of very talented and experienced engineers who were working on a defect issue with one specific line of faucets. Returns were extremely high and customer ill-will toward the company brand was growing.

The faucet sold well because of style and features, however, defects on the model were abnormally high.The engineering team, as all good experienced teams would do, had been pouring over every aspect of the manufacturing process, looking at packaging, looking at suppliers parts, doing detailed reviews of designs and design specs, assembling and dis-assembling loads of units right off the line trying to find the issue. My friend’s daughter, being new to faucets and having never installed one before, grabbed a finished product right off the line, sat down with the instructions, and proceeded to put the faucet together according to the steps provided.

No one else had thought to do this! To her amazement, the instructions walked a customer through a group of steps which not only broke the faucet, it voided the warranty as well. The product was mechanically sound and functioned perfectly when assembled properly; however, the average non-plumber customer follows instructions and doesn’t rely on a mechanical engineering degree or years of experience working with plumbing to install their own faucets.

An issue that had cost a company a considerable amount of money, capacity, and consumer ill-will, was solved by a rookie mechanical engineer intern without her utilizing her engineering skills. All of the team members working on the project had been putting faucets of ANY kind together for many years without ever pulling out instructions. They could assemble a faucet sight-unseen, on the fly and it would work perfectly, so no one even thought about considering the instructions as a source of the issue. It wasn’t ego, it was human nature. The team had been so close to the product for so long they could skip steps to get to a “quicker” result. They also had very similar backgrounds, and experience levels. It happens in every industry.

When asked by management what made her decide to look for problems with the instructions, my friend’s daughter said this:

“I wasn’t, it seemed like a logical place to start. Women and men think differently. I always read the instructions first. You have a lot of women customers so you need more women engineers.”

The perspective that diversity delivers is important. Don’t make the costly mistake of overlooking it.

Learn more about doing things differently in Climbing Mountains With Agile Methods.

Climbing Mountains With Agile Methods

Agile methods strive to break large goals into smaller achievable parts. In this post we will cover some high level concepts that have made it easy for us to achieve some big goals for our clients.

agile goalsBig goals, in many ways, are like mountains. They are daunting, arduous to climb (and well worth the view from the top). They capture our imagination and inspire bold action in ourselves and others just by being. Many gaze up at their peaks determined to reach the summit, but all too often, fall short for one reason or another.

Our struggles maintaining motivation when taking on large initiatives often stem from over-focusing our energy and attention on the end result, rather than the next step we must take to get there. We can get so overwhelmed by the sheer size of what lies ahead, frustrated by slow progress, and tripped up by unexpected pitfalls, we become demoralized long before we ever get close to the finish line. When this happens, it is because we have forgotten that big things are never accomplished with a single herculean effort; rather, they are overcome in progressive iterations – tackling a series of smaller tasks that bring us one step closer to the summit.

Agile Goals

When you break large objectives into small, measurable, achievable tasks, suddenly the mountain doesn’t seem so insurmountable. You start to think, okay, yeah…I can do this. Taking the journey step-by-step will will allow you to adapt when plans shift and celebrate milestones along the way. Side note: Seriously, don’t forget to celebrate the milestones – they are critical for maintaining morale and reinforcing positive change. This isn’t to say you should allow yourself to lose site of the big picture, just don’t let the magnitude kill your momentum.

This deliberate, iterative approach to “mountain” climbing is the same one we teach our clients and practice ourselves here at LeanDog. Here’s how it works: when someone comes in looking for help, whether for coaching or a development project, we always start by first assessing the situation. We explore every facet of their initiative to define where it is they are trying to go, the resources they have to get them there, and the struggles they may be facing. We also challenge assumptions and test hypotheses to uncover areas of risk hidden in their way. In doing so, we break their mountain down into a big pile of small, achievable objectives. We collaborate with them to prioritize those objectives and, through progressive iterations, we are able to carve out a path up the mountain together. The result is a clear direction, measurable progress, mitigated risk, and the overall feeling that yeah…we can do this.

By breaking down your large initiatives into smaller, achievable steps, challenging assumptions, celebrating milestones, and prioritizing tasks of highest value, you’ll find that what once seemed to be an impossible undertaking, is anything but. Before you know it, you’ll be enjoying the view from the summit and gazing confidently toward your next mountain.

How do you and your team achieve your biggest agile goals and initiatives?

To learn more about how Agile processes can help you climb your mountains, download a free copy of the LeanDog Agile Discussion Guide.

Agile Across Oceans

Last Wednesday, the Cleveland Council on World Affairs brought business development and entrepreneurial leaders from Cameroon, Gabon, Lesotho, Madagascar, Mauritius, Mozambique, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone to the LeanDog boat to see what we do. Nick Barendt, LeanDog’s Chief Development Officer, took the group on a tour of the office and studio, explaining how LeanDog makes use of Lean and Agile processes not only to build amazing software, but also run a dynamic, adaptable business in an environment that is constantly evolving and innovating.  While they were on board, they also got a lesson from Studio developer Gary on our how our 3D printer works, and the types of things we like to make with it. Katie Ferman, CCWA’s International Visitors Program Officer, remarked that “their visit to LeanDog was probably the single most interesting – and definitely the most visually engaging – session for our visitors during their time in Cleveland.”

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