Preaching To The Choir

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Recently, I was giving a class and during a portion of the class I discuss some of the cultural changes usually required for organizational progressive elaboration of work. During the break that followed this particular discussion, one of the attendees came up to me and said:

“Seems you’re preaching to the choir here. We all agree with what you’re sayin’…but it wont do any good unless we get the managers in here.”

While I certainly understand this reaction, and unfortunately find that it’s not that uncommon, I still find it a bit disheartening…and a little frustrating.

This attitude of “I can’t change the things that influence me”, and “what I can control isn’t big enough to really change anything” is entirely the wrong attitude.

Changing the things that you can control, no matter how seemingly insignificant, should never be down-played. One can always take complete control of their own actions, behaviors, and reactions. Combined with a little learning and a bit of creativity this can become very powerful indeed. So, try changing the things you can; the things over which you have direct control. Share what you’ve tried, what you’ve learned, what worked well and what didn’t. Share up, share down, make it visible, let people ask about it and then share with them too. Eventually this can influence up, down, and across the network of an organization.

Sometimes it only take one person to make a significant change. Other times it spreads slowly before snowballing into a major organization shift. And many times making a “major” or “significant” change isn’t even needed. Sometimes it’s the little things that count.

So, the moral of the story is that even the choir can use the message, and even the choir is able to go out into the world and try to make it a better place through their own actions…and employees who think their organization could be better are just as much on the hook for trying to improve it as the managers and executives are.

This post was originally published by the Matt Barcomb on odbox.co and was reposted with permission.